December 14

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[SGC-13] Sharpen Your Writing Skills With Connie Ragen Green

By Melissa Brown, MDMelissa Brown, MD


Connie Ragen Green walked away from her dual career as a teacher and real estate agent to start an online business in 2005. In the time since then, she’s figured out this whole online business thing and completely reinvented herself.

Connie has gone from ‘non-writer’ to prolific writer, blogger, and content creator. She has had multiple best-selling books and continues to write at least one book annually.

During our chat, Connie dropped many truth-bombs and nuggets of wisdom for your own online journey and she offered multiple tips to help you sharpen your own writing skills.

Don’t Miss Inside This Episode:

  • How Connie started online by monetizing her blog and how you can do the same.
  • Using your blog to create your first (or next) book.
  • Connie’s best advice for how she turned herself, a non-writer, into a writer. You can easily follow her lead with this simple strategy, too.
  • The first thing you must do before writing a blog post or article. This will save you a lot of time and make it a much easier task.
  • Why it’s important to separate your writing and editing tasks.
  • Big or small, we can all make a difference. You don’t have to wait until you’ve ‘made’ it. Now is a perfect time to make a difference in the world. 

Links and products mentioned in today’s episode:

Connie’s Blog article: Sharpen Your Writing Skills

750words.com Site for keeping track of daily writing habit.

Kiva.org Micro loans to change lives!

Really Simple Authority Blogging self-study course. Use CODE: AUTHORITYBLOGGING to bring the cost down to zero through January 31, 2023. This is a $499 course that Connie is offering only for the She’s Got Content listeners and only for a limited time. Don’t miss this!

Connie’s Action Habits Challenge – free. Helping you achieve your wildest dreams and goals.

About Connie Ragen Green

Connie Ragen Green is a multiple bestselling author, independent publisher, international speaker, and online marketing strategist, working with individuals and corporations on six continents to help them increase their credibility, expand their visibility, and explode their profitability.

Connie enjoys helping others create a business based on publishing content that tells their story in a way that attracts the right people into their community.

Connie works with new and newer online entrepreneurs and authors. She offers more than sixty products and courses, as well as an ongoing mentorship program.

Connie’s Website

ConnieRagenGreen.com

Connect With Connie on Social

Twitter: @ConnieGreen

About Your Host

Melissa Brown, MD – Coach, Author, Speaker, Teacher, and Podcast Host.

After leaving medical practice in 2009, Melissa discovered the online world and never looked back! After coach certification, she began a healthy lifestyle coaching practice online and quickly fell in love with blogging, writing, and content marketing.

Melissa believes that coaches have the power to change the world. Unfortunately, too many coaches get discouraged by the amount of content they need to create for marketing their business and this can lead to overwhelm and giving up on their dreams. There’s such a ripple effect when a dream dies, so Melissa is on a mission to help coaches and solopreneurs overcome the overwhelm when it comes to content creation so they keep those dreams alive.

Your content can impact massive amounts of people and positively change the world. You’ve got content in there inside you; let’s get it out into the world.

Check out these social media sites:

She’s Got Content Facebook group:

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

Get your FREE Never Run Out of Content Ideas Tool Kit/Workbook

Thanks for listening!

Thanks so much for listening to this podcast. It means the world to me to have you here on this journey! If you got value from this episode, please share it on social media, and recommend it to your business besties.

Please leave feedback or questions about this episode in the comment section below.

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Transcript
Connie Ragen Green:

At the end of the day, we want people to feel something.

Connie Ragen Green:

Whatever that emotion is, whatever that ends up being for them because

Connie Ragen Green:

if you don't feel something from something we hear or see or read,

Connie Ragen Green:

it's just another thing that day that we heard or we saw or we read.

Connie Ragen Green:

But I think once people feel something, then anything is possible.

Melissa Brown:

Content Creators, get ready to meet my next guest, Connie Ragen Green.

Melissa Brown:

Connie is a prolific bestselling author with multiple bestsellers to her credit.

Melissa Brown:

She is an independent publisher, international speaker, and

Melissa Brown:

online marketing strategist.

Melissa Brown:

She works with individuals and corporations on six continents

Melissa Brown:

to help them increase their credibility, expand their visibility,

Melissa Brown:

and explode their profitability.

Melissa Brown:

I recently sat down with Connie for a chat about how she got started on her

Melissa Brown:

online journey, and I uncovered some fascinating anecdotes about her life.

Melissa Brown:

Connie's story is inspiring.

Melissa Brown:

She also shared several ways you can work on improving your own writing skills.

Melissa Brown:

I hope you'll be moved to take action, maybe give back, and maybe make a

Melissa Brown:

difference much like Connie, because as you'll hear, we can all make a difference.

Melissa Brown:

Before we dive into today's episode, I wanna give a shout out to one of you

Melissa Brown:

listeners who left a very kind review on Apple Podcast in the last few weeks.

Melissa Brown:

Today's Content Creator of the week is Katie@SolopreneurCafe.

Melissa Brown:

Here's a short snippet from her review.

Melissa Brown:

Katie wrote, "After listening to the first few episodes of the She's Got Content

Melissa Brown:

podcast, I can tell you that they are packed with usable, realistic advice."

Melissa Brown:

Thank you so much for your review, Katie@SolopreneurCafe.

Melissa Brown:

I really appreciate that you took the time out to kindly leave a thoughtful review.

Melissa Brown:

You, too, can be my next Content Creator and I'll give you a shout out too.

Melissa Brown:

Just leave a review over on Apple Podcast.

Melissa Brown:

It's easy peasy and I so appreciate it.

Melissa Brown:

Thank you.

Melissa Brown:

Now, get set to listen in as bestselling author, Connie Ragen

Melissa Brown:

Green shares her story and also helps you sharpen up your writing skills.

Melissa Brown:

Welcome back everyone to the She's Got Content podcast.

Melissa Brown:

Today, I'm so excited to have Connie Ragen Green in the house.

Melissa Brown:

Welcome, Connie.

Connie Ragen Green:

Thank you so much, Melissa.

Melissa Brown:

This is really exciting.

Melissa Brown:

I have followed you, Connie for I don't know how many years, and

Melissa Brown:

I can't, I'm pinching myself now having you here on the podcast.

Melissa Brown:

This is really an honor.

Melissa Brown:

Thank you so much for coming on and sharing your wisdom with us.

Connie Ragen Green:

Oh, well you didn't tell me about the wisdom part,

Connie Ragen Green:

but I'll do my very best for you.

Melissa Brown:

I know you always do.

Melissa Brown:

I often like to start off kinda with a, oh, we might wanna call it an icebreaker

Melissa Brown:

or whatever, but I'm finding out so many interesting facts about my guests

Melissa Brown:

here, and I like asking this question.

Melissa Brown:

Is there a little known fun fact about, Connie, that you could share with us?

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, I like to think everything is fun, but I'm thinking

Connie Ragen Green:

of, in particular, I have raised two chimpanzees that were very, very young

Connie Ragen Green:

when I got them to young adulthood.

Connie Ragen Green:

And most people wouldn't know that about me because it happened

Connie Ragen Green:

when I was in my twenties.

Connie Ragen Green:

I was in my twenties for both of them and I just loved them dearly.

Connie Ragen Green:

And that's a fun fact.

Melissa Brown:

That takes the cake right there.

Melissa Brown:

Alright, you're gonna have to expand a little bit on how that happened.

Melissa Brown:

How did that come to be?

Connie Ragen Green:

All right.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I wanted to be a veterinarian as I was growing up.

Connie Ragen Green:

Love animals, so much, And a friend and I, we volunteered at the zoo, so

Connie Ragen Green:

that was when I was in junior high age.

Connie Ragen Green:

And we would take two buses, maybe a third bus every Saturday and Sunday.

Connie Ragen Green:

We'd go to the zoo, we would volunteer, we would do all these things.

Connie Ragen Green:

And they had a chimpanzee there named Samantha who was really,

Connie Ragen Green:

we thought of more like a pet.

Connie Ragen Green:

And so we would spend time and we'd hold her and comb her and feed her

Connie Ragen Green:

and then get on with the rest of our volunteer work for those days.

Connie Ragen Green:

So a few years later, I was in college and I began working at a vet.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I was actually paid, it was a part-time position, but I thought, this will help me

Connie Ragen Green:

if I really wanna become a veterinarian.

Connie Ragen Green:

And he worked with some exotics, exotic animals of all kinds.

Connie Ragen Green:

And this is back when they allowed in the United States for you to

Connie Ragen Green:

bring in animals such as baby chimps.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's no longer allowed I'm happy to say , but he said, I have one and

Connie Ragen Green:

the person that was going to take it just doesn't want to take him.

Connie Ragen Green:

Would you be interested?

Connie Ragen Green:

And I said, have my own chimp to have him.

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, yeah.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I ended up getting that chimp and that was Toby.

Connie Ragen Green:

He was the first one.

Connie Ragen Green:

And it's like having a little child.

Connie Ragen Green:

You potty train them and you except, well, except for different, they can

Connie Ragen Green:

kinda swing from the chandeliers, that kinda thing, but clothes,

Connie Ragen Green:

little clothes and everything.

Connie Ragen Green:

And then as he got older, so he was maybe a year and a half, he started

Connie Ragen Green:

to be a little bit aggressive.

Connie Ragen Green:

And so that's when I learned that you really can't keep them.

Connie Ragen Green:

And so we found a wonderful place for him to go.

Connie Ragen Green:

About a couple years later, there was another opportunity, and that was Tracy.

Connie Ragen Green:

And so Tracy came to live with us that's my husband and I.

Connie Ragen Green:

And again, it was about a year and a half or so and we had so much fun.

Connie Ragen Green:

It was just, cause see, it was a different world back then, as you can imagine.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I drove a Corvette and the chimps, you'd take off the tee tops and the

Connie Ragen Green:

chimps would stick their head up.

Connie Ragen Green:

And it's a wonder we never caused an accident.

Connie Ragen Green:

And one time we went into a movie theater and I had him and I was kinda

Connie Ragen Green:

holding him like an infant with a blanket, and a lady was giving me

Connie Ragen Green:

just kind of a really mean look.

Connie Ragen Green:

I don't know what that was about, but I uncovered the top of the head and

Connie Ragen Green:

she saw the baby chimp and I thought she was gonna fall over, but she

Connie Ragen Green:

stopped looking at me, that's for sure.

Melissa Brown:

Interesting.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah, I don't think I've ever heard anyone tell me a fun fact about themselves

Melissa Brown:

that they had raised a chimpanzee.

Melissa Brown:

That one is really, well, you learn something about people all the time.

Melissa Brown:

And I know, Connie, you've got a really interesting story about coming on career,

Melissa Brown:

career-wise is just really interesting.

Melissa Brown:

You started out as a teacher, well maybe you started out as a vet tech

Melissa Brown:

first, but I think that your story is so interesting and I would love for you

Melissa Brown:

to share your journey on coming online.

Melissa Brown:

Share your journey with our audience, if you will.

Connie Ragen Green:

Okay.

Connie Ragen Green:

All right.

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, I grew up, it was just my mom and I, and so my parents divorced when I

Connie Ragen Green:

was three, and I didn't have much of a relationship with my father growing up.

Connie Ragen Green:

So it was my mom and I.

Connie Ragen Green:

We were so poor and she taught me that education was the way out of poverty.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I went on to college, ended up at UCLA, graduated from UCLA.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I really wanted to go into real estate.

Connie Ragen Green:

I wanted to do things with real estate, but I wasn't really knowledgeable

Connie Ragen Green:

enough and I was too young.

Connie Ragen Green:

Usually somebody young in real estate has bought and sold

Connie Ragen Green:

a house or two and I hadn't.

Connie Ragen Green:

So over time I decided, well, you know, maybe I need to find something else.

Connie Ragen Green:

And then the space shuttle, the Challenger disaster occurred.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I had gone to my real estate office at that point, cause I was

Connie Ragen Green:

working part-time in real estate.

Connie Ragen Green:

And it was on the tv.

Connie Ragen Green:

And when Christa McCullough her students, they had 'em there and they

Connie Ragen Green:

were in New Hampshire, I believe.

Connie Ragen Green:

And at that moment I thought, I had wanted to be a teacher growing up.

Connie Ragen Green:

I used to teach my stuffed animals in front of a chalkboard and stuff.

Connie Ragen Green:

And so I thought, I'm going go back to school.

Connie Ragen Green:

And many people were inspired to do something, to join the

Connie Ragen Green:

military, to go back to school, something because of that disaster.

Connie Ragen Green:

And within a year, I was an assistant in a classroom, then I was a substitute.

Connie Ragen Green:

And then I was hired on an emergency credential for a

Connie Ragen Green:

full-time teaching position.

Connie Ragen Green:

So by that point I was 30 years old.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I became a teacher at 30.

Connie Ragen Green:

Now I was going to give up real estate, but I thought, let's see how this works.

Connie Ragen Green:

The first couple of months, well, we went on strike, and when you go on strike,

Connie Ragen Green:

it's a work action that you're choosing to take and nobody feels bad for you.

Connie Ragen Green:

People would yell at me in grocery stores, all kinds of things.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I thought, I don't know how long this strike's going to last, but I no

Connie Ragen Green:

longer have a job and I've chosen not to.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I would go to the real estate office, after we would walk the picket

Connie Ragen Green:

line in the morning, and I decided to keep both careers, real estate

Connie Ragen Green:

as I was getting more experience with that and classroom teaching.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I did that for the next 20 years.

Connie Ragen Green:

But over that 20 years from age 30 to age 50, we get older, we have illness, we

Connie Ragen Green:

have injury, we have all kinds of things.

Connie Ragen Green:

And also the school system changed.

Connie Ragen Green:

I was in Los Angeles Unified School District, which is probably the second

Connie Ragen Green:

largest in the country or the third.

Melissa Brown:

Right.

Connie Ragen Green:

And finally we had to teach to the test,

Connie Ragen Green:

which they kept saying, we're not doing that, we're not doing that.

Connie Ragen Green:

But it was exactly what they were doing.

Connie Ragen Green:

It was no fun.

Connie Ragen Green:

Nobody wanted to be there.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I thought, I'm the adult.

Connie Ragen Green:

I have to do something different.

Connie Ragen Green:

So my prayer is to find something I could do from home.

Connie Ragen Green:

Dear God, I need something I can do from home, from my bedroom, if necessary,

Connie Ragen Green:

because of my illness and injury.

Connie Ragen Green:

I wanna be able to meet all of my financial obligations with grace and ease.

Connie Ragen Green:

My mother was still alive.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'm the only child.

Connie Ragen Green:

I was helping her, and sure enough that prayer was answered when I

Connie Ragen Green:als, this is in the spring of:Melissa Brown:

Um hmm

Connie Ragen Green:

So individuals had businesses online.

Connie Ragen Green:

I had no idea.

Connie Ragen Green:

I knew that bookstores and Montgomery Ward and different places had businesses

Connie Ragen Green:

online, but I didn't know individuals did.

Connie Ragen Green:I made my plan and by June of:Connie Ragen Green:

and given away my best real estate clients and started an online business.

Connie Ragen Green:

And there I sat that summer in front of the computer and

Connie Ragen Green:

wondered, how in the world will I actually make money from this?

Connie Ragen Green:

I had left that part of the plan out.

Connie Ragen Green:

I was so getting money from teaching in real estate and moving to a new

Connie Ragen Green:

city with a new house and a new house payment, and so I thought, I

Connie Ragen Green:

have to figure this out, and I did.

Melissa Brown:

That's so interesting.

Melissa Brown:

It just seems like I'm hearing time and again, time and again how necessity

Melissa Brown:

being the mother of invention, how

Connie Ragen Green:

yes.

Melissa Brown:

People have been presented with a situation where it's like, sink

Melissa Brown:

or swim here, I've gotta figure this out.

Melissa Brown:

And you did.

Melissa Brown:

You figured it out and beautifully figured it out.

Melissa Brown:

And I'm not saying it was an overnight success.

Melissa Brown:

I know that never happens.

Connie Ragen Green:

No.

Melissa Brown:

What is that old saying?

Melissa Brown:

The overnight successes happen after three years or something

Melissa Brown:

takes three years to become

Connie Ragen Green:

we're still, you and I, we're still overnight

Connie Ragen Green:

successes in the process, right?

Melissa Brown:

Yes, absolutely.

Melissa Brown:

When you say you figured it out, what did that look like or how did

Melissa Brown:

that manifest itself initially?

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, initially, the person that had got me interested, I had

Connie Ragen Green:

heard a CD from him, and I had become just so enthralled with this idea of

Connie Ragen Green:

making money while I sleep and doing it from a home computer and this and that.

Connie Ragen Green:

He was selling an information product that solved a problem on a one page website.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I thought, well, if I could just think of some problems and just write something

Connie Ragen Green:

about the problems and sell to people.

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, I just wasn't very creative at that point.

Connie Ragen Green:

Since then, I consider myself very creative, but not then.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I thought, okay, well then what should I do?

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, I was fortunate enough through this man who wasn't a great

Connie Ragen Green:

mentor for a brand new person.

Connie Ragen Green:

But I thought, what can I learn from him during that year?

Connie Ragen Green:

Cause I paid him quite a bit of money.

Melissa Brown:

Mm-hmm.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I was connected with people that then were going to

Connie Ragen Green:

be the ones that would help me and I wouldn't have found them on my own easily.

Connie Ragen Green:

And starting a blog was the first solution to how do you get started online.

Connie Ragen Green:

Cause your blog is your home on the internet.

Connie Ragen Green:

And so I was an overachiever a bit.

Connie Ragen Green:

I started 12 blogs.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

Because I said, this is what I told myself, Melissa.

Connie Ragen Green:

I said, I am a college educated woman of diverse interest

Connie Ragen Green:

and I can't have one niche.

Connie Ragen Green:

I can't.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's not possible.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I had my dog blog cause I love dogs and always have dogs.

Connie Ragen Green:

I had my reinvent your life blog.

Connie Ragen Green:

Healthy walking, something about that.

Connie Ragen Green:

I had law of attraction.

Connie Ragen Green:

I had just a number of things.

Connie Ragen Green:

And finally, I had one on ebook writing and marketing, cause

Connie Ragen Green:

people were writing eBooks.

Connie Ragen Green:They were pretty new in:Connie Ragen Green:

And I took a course from Joe Vitale and I also connected with Jimmy D.

Connie Ragen Green:

Brown and Jim Edwards, a few people that I still know today and consider

Connie Ragen Green:

friends, all three of those today.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I started doing the ebookwritingandmarketingsuccess.com site.

Connie Ragen Green:

That was the one I landed on.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's the one where I would practice my writing, cause I wasn't a writer.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'd always wanted to write, but I didn't do much of it.

Connie Ragen Green:

I came online and realized you really have to write.

Connie Ragen Green:

So a year or so later, ebookwritingandmarketingsecrets.com

Connie Ragen Green:

got forwarded to ConnieRagengreen.com.

Connie Ragen Green:

So those sites are still there.

Connie Ragen Green:

Still exist.

Connie Ragen Green:

And by doing the writing, I learned that at the bottom you

Connie Ragen Green:

always put a call to action.

Connie Ragen Green:

So on the blog itself, people can opt in.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's usually on the right sidebar.

Connie Ragen Green:

You give them a gift of some type.

Connie Ragen Green:

They give you their name and email address so you can be

Connie Ragen Green:

in touch with them via email.

Connie Ragen Green:

And also at the bottom at every article, I've done this now about

Connie Ragen Green:

3,700 times in all these years.

Connie Ragen Green:

At the bottom is something for sale.

Connie Ragen Green:

It might be something of mine, it might be an affiliate offer,

Connie Ragen Green:

but it's something inexpensive.

Connie Ragen Green:

And that's how I started to monetize everything.

Connie Ragen Green:

So through affiliate marketing, finally through my products.

Connie Ragen Green:

But the blogs continue.

Connie Ragen Green:

I now have three blogs.

Connie Ragen Green:I started the third one in:Melissa Brown:

Okay, let's talk about that for a moment.

Melissa Brown:

You said 'your most recent book.' I know you're a prolific author.

Melissa Brown:

You are constantly writing, and I know I've been fascinated

Melissa Brown:

hearing you talk about your day.

Melissa Brown:

Like how you get up and you write and it's just a habit for you.

Melissa Brown:

But tell us about these eBooks that you've published.

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, in the beginning I was publishing them on my

Connie Ragen Green:

own website, which is still an excellent idea, because you keep all the money

Connie Ragen Green:

and you can sell them for more on your website than you could on Amazon.

Connie Ragen Green:

The problem is, you have to drive traffic to those sites on your own.

Connie Ragen Green:

And paying for traffic gets very old very quickly.

Connie Ragen Green:

As soon as you stop paying, the traffic stops coming.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's like a newspaper where once the ad is not paid for, it's like an old

Connie Ragen Green:

newspaper, it's just goes in the garbage.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I thought, okay, so let's see what Amazon is doing.

Connie Ragen Green:Well, I came online:Connie Ragen Green:By:Connie Ragen Green:

were many people that were upset.

Connie Ragen Green:

They didn't like that idea that they were taking business from traditional

Connie Ragen Green:

publishers, but for me it would be two more years before a traditional

Connie Ragen Green:

publisher even gave me the time of day.

Connie Ragen Green:

And by that time, I was sold on self-publishing.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I was able to sell things on the Kindle version cuz Kindle didn't exist.

Connie Ragen Green:

Create space, if you remember that, from Amazon?

Connie Ragen Green:None of that existed in:Connie Ragen Green:

So I started writing and publishing books.

Connie Ragen Green:

And it became so much fun.

Connie Ragen Green:

The first book, I blogged.

Connie Ragen Green:

Huge Profits With a Tiny List:50 Ways To Use Relationship Marketing

Connie Ragen Green:

To Increase Your Bottom Line.

Connie Ragen Green:

And then from that I just turned myself into a writer.

Connie Ragen Green:

I wanted to be a writer and now I am.

Melissa Brown:

You said you blogged that first book, meaning you wrote blog posts

Melissa Brown:

and then collated them into this ebook?

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

I had a couple of mentors, and these are people that took me

Connie Ragen Green:

under their wing informally, and I'm still friends with them.

Connie Ragen Green:

Alex Mandossian.

Connie Ragen Green:

If you know him, and Raymond Aaron.

Connie Ragen Green:

That may not be a common name.

Connie Ragen Green:

But both of them within a couple of months of each other, they both heard me speaking

Connie Ragen Green:

at an event and they both said, you're making lots of money with a small list.

Connie Ragen Green:

You need to write about that.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I told both of 'em that the other one had said it and I said, yeah,

Connie Ragen Green:

I'm gonna set up a blog and do it.

Connie Ragen Green:o that was my second blog, in:Connie Ragen Green:

And every couple of days I would think of a new idea.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I would add a new blog post.

Connie Ragen Green:

And finally I went from 10 to 20 to 25, and I thought if I have 50 ideas,

Connie Ragen Green:

I could copy /paste those into a book.

Connie Ragen Green:

And people would say, but why wouldn't people just read the blog?

Connie Ragen Green:

We'd rather pay $10 and have the whole thing put together in the book.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's really the answer.

Melissa Brown:

Brilliant.

Melissa Brown:

Just brilliant

Melissa Brown:

. Connie Ragen Green: But now

Melissa Brown:

People are blogging books.

Melissa Brown:

Well, but actually doing it is another story because we all know

Melissa Brown:

many of us have creative ideas and just doing the do is sometimes the hard part.

Connie Ragen Green:

We can discipline ourselves though to make it happen.

Connie Ragen Green:

We have to, and I hated discipline.

Connie Ragen Green:

I hated the idea of it and now I embrace it.

Melissa Brown:

And sometimes it's just a habit, right?

Melissa Brown:

I mean discipline is often just a habit.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Melissa Brown:

Do you have a total number of how many eBooks

Melissa Brown:

you have written over the years?

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, at some point I started releasing my books,

Connie Ragen Green:

paperback and Kindle version.

Connie Ragen Green:

So starting from that first one, pretty much they're all in both formats.

Connie Ragen Green:

And now with this new one, I've done the paperback first, then the

Connie Ragen Green:

pinball slash ebook one will come out in a few days, and now hard back.

Connie Ragen Green:

They're doing hard cover over at Amazon now.

Connie Ragen Green:

So it's very exciting.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I have 26 books and

Melissa Brown:

Amazing.

Connie Ragen Green:

They're out there and my goal is one per year for sure.

Connie Ragen Green:

I've done two or sometimes three in a few years.

Connie Ragen Green:

Last year I did one, my In Pursuit of Healthy-Ness, How I Used Intermittent

Connie Ragen Green:

Fasting to Reinvent My Life.

Connie Ragen Green:

And this most recent one, which is Essays at the Intersection

Connie Ragen Green:

of Hope and Synchronicity.

Melissa Brown:

Love it.

Melissa Brown:

I wanna circle back to something you said previously about how you

Melissa Brown:

claimed that you didn't really know how to write in the beginning.

Melissa Brown:

You were not a writer, correct?

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

So it goes back to fourth grade and there was a boy named Danny Lucas.

Connie Ragen Green:

He was just kind of a peculiar child.

Connie Ragen Green:

He looked peculiar and he acted peculiar, but he was my friend.

Connie Ragen Green:

And he was a writer.

Connie Ragen Green:

He was already a writer at nine years old, and he was going to write something

Connie Ragen Green:

that they were gonna use at school.

Connie Ragen Green:

And he said, do you wanna write with me?

Connie Ragen Green:

And I said, yeah, I'll do it.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I thought, this is it.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'm in.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'm gonna be writing with Danny Lucas.

Connie Ragen Green:

What could be better?

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, I wrote a little bit, Danny didn't like what I wrote, I don't remember

Connie Ragen Green:

the details, but finally he said, I'm just gonna finish this on my own.

Connie Ragen Green:

We'll write something next year.

Connie Ragen Green:

Something like that.

Connie Ragen Green:

He was very nice.

Connie Ragen Green:

Let me off the hook.

Connie Ragen Green:

But he continued to write and I continued to feel like my

Connie Ragen Green:

writing, it just isn't much.

Connie Ragen Green:

The reason my writing wasn't good was I didn't do it until I was given

Connie Ragen Green:

an assignment at school or took a class and had to write something.

Connie Ragen Green:

I would do the work, but then the class was over.

Connie Ragen Green:

I would go on to the next grade and then I didn't keep writing.

Connie Ragen Green:

And then high school, college age, I wanted to write for television and film.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I get to UCLA and I actually know people that are writing professionally,

Connie Ragen Green:

and I thought that's what I wanna do.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I took a couple of writing classes and I did the assignments,

Connie Ragen Green:

but once again, when the class was over, I stopped writing.

Connie Ragen Green:

So came online and I thought, I'm gonna need to write.

Connie Ragen Green:

So that was the first habit that I made myself get into.

Connie Ragen Green:

Writing every day.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I still have those old original blog posts and short reports.

Connie Ragen Green:

They're horrible.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's embarrassing, but that's how I got started.

Connie Ragen Green:

We only get better if we continue to do something.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's the only way.

Connie Ragen Green:

All those years I was teaching, Melissa, 20 years, I seldom had a

Connie Ragen Green:

child who was a native English speaker.

Connie Ragen Green:

They tended to speak Spanish or Tagalog from the Philippines.

Connie Ragen Green:

And writing was going to be the most difficult thing for them.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I said, you have to write every day, even when we're not in school.

Connie Ragen Green:

Every day, Mrs.

Connie Ragen Green:

Green?

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

Write a paragraph.

Connie Ragen Green:

Write something.

Connie Ragen Green:

Your writing will improve.

Connie Ragen Green:

The ones who did that, the writing improved.

Connie Ragen Green:

The ones who didn't, they suffered year after year.

Connie Ragen Green:

I came online and took my own advice.

Connie Ragen Green:

Finally.

Connie Ragen Green:

And now if I don't write one day, well, I don't know if that would even happen,

Connie Ragen Green:

but it feels like I've left the stove on or I've lost my keys or something.

Connie Ragen Green:

I didn't write.

Melissa Brown:

When it becomes a habit like that.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah.

Melissa Brown:

It's like you don't wanna, as Jerry Seinfeld says,

Melissa Brown:

don't wanna break the chain.

Melissa Brown:

Writing is a skill that you can hone.

Connie Ragen Green:

It is.

Connie Ragen Green:

It is.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I was talking about that today on a call.

Connie Ragen Green:

I was saying that talent is one thing, and I don't know that I ever would

Connie Ragen Green:

feel that I was talented with writing.

Connie Ragen Green:

The skill is developed over time and the discipline, you make it a habit, that's

Connie Ragen Green:

something you have full control over.

Melissa Brown:

Mm-hmm.

Melissa Brown:

. Connie Ragen Green: So now I

Melissa Brown:

knows that I'm going to write.

Melissa Brown:

I use a site, I don't know if you know a site called 750 words.com,

Melissa Brown:

so it's the number seven 50.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah, so I've been writing there for several years and I was purposely

Melissa Brown:

breaking my streaks there so I wouldn't become a slave to the streak.

Melissa Brown:

Right now I'm on about a 300 day streak with them.

Melissa Brown:

I'll break it maybe at the one year mark or something, but I love that

Melissa Brown:

to just keep me focused on what's important in my life because at this

Melissa Brown:

point I've started doing professional writing for film and television.

Melissa Brown:

Which is something I always wanted to do, and I wouldn't have been able to

Melissa Brown:ng what I've been doing since:Melissa Brown:

You've circled right back.

Melissa Brown:

You wanted to be a writer for television and now your dream is coming true.

Connie Ragen Green:

It is.

Melissa Brown:

Has come true.

Connie Ragen Green:

It is it's really, it's so exciting, because we really

Connie Ragen Green:

do have control over our destiny.

Connie Ragen Green:

We have control over so much.

Connie Ragen Green:

That we make excuses for it.

Connie Ragen Green:

That we weren't lucky or they wanted someone else or something but that's

Connie Ragen Green:

just stories we're telling ourselves.

Connie Ragen Green:

It doesn't mean there's any fact in them.

Connie Ragen Green:

Not much, at least.

Melissa Brown:

Hmm.

Melissa Brown:

For the coaches or the small business owners who are listening today and they

Melissa Brown:

think that they're not good writers, I stumbled across one of your blog

Melissa Brown:

posts on ConnieRagenGreen.com, and it's about sharpening your writing skills.

Melissa Brown:

It was seven ways to sharpen your writing skills that you've

Melissa Brown:

discovered over the years.

Melissa Brown:

The first one is knowing your audience.

Melissa Brown:

So yeah, if you don't know who you're writing to, just as

Melissa Brown:

you discovered probably with screenwriting for television, you

Melissa Brown:

gotta know your audience, right?

Connie Ragen Green:

You do.

Connie Ragen Green:

And it's interesting cuz I'm in a professional group.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'm in a few different writing groups, but one, it's really a professional

Connie Ragen Green:

group and what I love about it is that I'm really at the bottom in

Connie Ragen Green:

terms of experience professionally writing for film or television.

Connie Ragen Green:

And we're given assignments regularly and you submit it.

Connie Ragen Green:

The leader of our group is a very well known person in Hollywood with writing.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's his passion.

Connie Ragen Green:

And he reads it over and then he posts it for the group.

Connie Ragen Green:

And it's interesting because that's a different audience in my mind.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's people that are going to critique, they're finally gonna have comments about

Connie Ragen Green:

how we've written and what we've written.

Connie Ragen Green:

And it's interesting how that makes a difference, because any one of

Connie Ragen Green:

those people could be very similar to me away from the writing world,

Connie Ragen Green:

but I don't know them in that way.

Connie Ragen Green:

They don't become friends in that way, where you would know,

Connie Ragen Green:

do they like to drive cars or to travel to Europe or something?

Connie Ragen Green:

You don't know those things about them.

Connie Ragen Green:

So it's interesting because if you know your audience, it makes it a

Connie Ragen Green:

whole lot easier because you know what they might need and or want.

Connie Ragen Green:

And if you can give that to them.

Connie Ragen Green:

Because I think of everything we're doing in business, we're serving people.

Melissa Brown:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

Serving.

Connie Ragen Green:

Once we serve people, cuz if somebody writes something about

Connie Ragen Green:

writing that will be helpful to me.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'll read the whole book just to find a little part of it, serving

Connie Ragen Green:

me with what I want and need.

Melissa Brown:

The golden nuggets.

Melissa Brown:

Right.

Melissa Brown:

That was your number one of the seven ways to sharpen your writing skills.

Melissa Brown:

The number two was outline before you write, and I know

Melissa Brown:

so many people resist that.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes, I did.

Melissa Brown:

I do.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah, I resist it.

Melissa Brown:

I do it, but I resist it.

Connie Ragen Green:

Because I was the person in school and

Connie Ragen Green:

I did fairly well in school.

Connie Ragen Green:

I made A's and Bs.

Connie Ragen Green:

But when they wanted an outline for something, I would always write

Connie Ragen Green:

first and then go back and do the outline from my completed writing.

Melissa Brown:

I did the same thing.

Connie Ragen Green:

Did you do that?

Connie Ragen Green:

But the writing was so much better the other way.

Connie Ragen Green:

Once I discovered how to do an outline for my books, now it's kind of simple.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'm gonna start writing a book with a colleague in January.

Connie Ragen Green:

In 30 days, we're gonna have a 30,000 word book.

Connie Ragen Green:

No sweat.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's easy because we'll be working from an outline.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I teach that to people now twice a year.

Connie Ragen Green:

I have a 10 week author program, and it's so wonderful that they

Connie Ragen Green:

have to have a tight outline.

Connie Ragen Green:

If you're writing flounders, you have to go back to the outline.

Connie Ragen Green:

Once you fix up the outline, the writing flows.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah, it's like creating the bones and then you

Melissa Brown:

fill in the flesh in between.

Melissa Brown:

Isn't that kind of like what happens with the outline?

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah.

Connie Ragen Green:

I think of a book called Writing down the Bones.

Melissa Brown:

Yes.

Melissa Brown:

I think that's sitting on my shelf actually.

Melissa Brown:

. Connie Ragen Green: Yeah.

Melissa Brown:

Cause the writing, there's such great joy from it and it's

Melissa Brown:

appreciated by people around us.

Melissa Brown:

So I live in two cities.

Melissa Brown:

And in one of the cities, there's a man that I've talked to him and

Melissa Brown:

his wife on numerous occasions when I've been walking a dog or

Melissa Brown:

something, and he has a motorcycle.

Melissa Brown:

And then he became a principal of a middle school.

Melissa Brown:

And I saw that in the email I get from the newspaper.

Melissa Brown:

And he was so excited.

Melissa Brown:

I said, you're famous.

Melissa Brown:

I saw your name and your picture.

Melissa Brown:

And he said, they sent that out?

Melissa Brown:

And I said, yeah.

Melissa Brown:

So I was telling him that I write and he had asked me, well, can I

Melissa Brown:

buy one of your books sometime?

Melissa Brown:

And I said, no, I'm gonna give you a book or two.

Melissa Brown:

Well, I had forgotten about it.

Melissa Brown:

So the other evening I was over in that other city and I said, you

Melissa Brown:

know what, I've got books with me.

Melissa Brown:

So I've got three books, including the new one.

Melissa Brown:

And I wrote it to him and I took it down.

Melissa Brown:

His wife answered the door.

Melissa Brown:

They were so excited.

Melissa Brown:

And both of them, 'we know an author, we know someone who writes

Melissa Brown:

books.' It's such a big deal.

Melissa Brown:

And I apologize for forgetting for a couple of months and doing other things.

Melissa Brown:

And I'll tell you the biggest impact that this brought me ever, Melissa, my

Melissa Brown:

mother, before she passed away, she broke her hip and was in an assisted living.

Melissa Brown:

And so I was going there and that's when that first book,

Melissa Brown:

Huge Profits With a Tiny List.

Melissa Brown:

That's when that book came out and they send you some proof

Melissa Brown:

copies if you request them.

Melissa Brown:

And I did.

Melissa Brown:

And I took one over to her and gave it to her, and she was 93 years old

Melissa Brown:

when she had the book in her hand.

Melissa Brown:

. . She didn't know the world of computers.

Melissa Brown:

She knew typewriters, right?

Melissa Brown:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

She knew books that you buy in a bookstore

Connie Ragen Green:

or check out at a library.

Connie Ragen Green:

When she had that book in her hand, all of a sudden she understood me and what

Connie Ragen Green:

I had been doing for a few years and she said, well, you must bring me more.

Connie Ragen Green:

My friends will want these.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I'm so thankful.

Connie Ragen Green:

Thank you, God, that I did this while she was still alive because I didn't

Connie Ragen Green:

understand how powerful it would be.

Melissa Brown:

Ah, that's a beautiful story.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah, so she got to hold that book in her hand.

Melissa Brown:

She got to read it too, I'm sure.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yep.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah.

Connie Ragen Green:

Over and over.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah.

Melissa Brown:

Getting back to your sharpening your writing skills numbers.

Melissa Brown:

I have another one.

Melissa Brown:

The number three one, writing your first draft.

Melissa Brown:

And as many as you need.

Melissa Brown:

That first draft- oh man, I got into the trying-to-edit-while-I-was-writing deal.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah.

Melissa Brown:

I don't do that now, but in the beginning it was

Melissa Brown:

like, oh, it was such a slog.

Melissa Brown:

Writing was just so slow.

Melissa Brown:

So write your first draft and then go back and edit.

Melissa Brown:

Right?

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah.

Connie Ragen Green:

I just published a short article with that very title, Writing

Connie Ragen Green:

Your First Draft, this morning.

Connie Ragen Green:

I finished it last night, but I scheduled it, it came out this morning.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's different parts of the brain perhaps.

Melissa Brown:

Yes.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah.

Melissa Brown:

That's it.

Connie Ragen Green:

More about this than I do.

Connie Ragen Green:

So the only thing I'll do if I'm doing it on screen, then I can just do an X.

Connie Ragen Green:

I do a capital X next to something that I know I need to come back to edit.

Connie Ragen Green:

There are different things that different writers use.

Connie Ragen Green:

If I'm writing by hand, it's real easy to use a different colored pen.

Connie Ragen Green:

I write in black usually, so I can use blue, but I know better than

Connie Ragen Green:

to try to edit because I've been down that path too many times.

Connie Ragen Green:

And then it ruined my creative flow for the writing itself, and I end up with

Connie Ragen Green:

one page that's perfectly edited perhaps, but 10 pages that were never written.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah.

Melissa Brown:

I hear you.

Melissa Brown:

So just write that first draft and then go back.

Melissa Brown:

And I like to let mine marinate for a while, at least overnight.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Melissa Brown:

And then go back and do the editing.

Melissa Brown:

And it just makes it flow so much easier.

Melissa Brown:

And another tip you give is about using conversational tone while writing.

Melissa Brown:

That was one that was very difficult for me to switch over from academia

Melissa Brown:

writing and the way that I had to write notes for medicine and

Melissa Brown:

how you write for your audience.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's funny cuz I've had medical issues over the years and in one,

Connie Ragen Green:

I was reading my own report, they had written about me and they

Connie Ragen Green:

called me a well-nourished female.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I love that.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's so polite.

Connie Ragen Green:

Instead of saying, boy, she's overweight, she needs to lose some weight, I

Connie Ragen Green:

was a well-nourished female and at first, I smiled and then I frowned.

Connie Ragen Green:

I thought, oh, I don't wanna be so well nourished.

Connie Ragen Green:

That was pretty funny.

Connie Ragen Green:

It is a different type of writing and it's a world that I wasn't a part of.

Connie Ragen Green:

I wasn't part of the corporate world.

Connie Ragen Green:

I wasn't part of a professional world such as, you continue

Connie Ragen Green:

to do, I guess and everything.

Connie Ragen Green:

But I think we all have to start from where we're at.

Connie Ragen Green:

I wrote poetry growing up because it was short.

Connie Ragen Green:

You could finish it pretty quickly, or in my mind I thought that.

Connie Ragen Green:

But once when I wanted to write blog posts and they got shorter and

Connie Ragen Green:

shorter, they started out 250 words.

Connie Ragen Green:

Then nobody wanted them.

Connie Ragen Green:

If you were gonna submit them to a directory, nobody wanted

Connie Ragen Green:

under 300, then they went to 500.

Connie Ragen Green:

Now, I can't imagine publishing anything less than 750 words.

Connie Ragen Green:Most of what I publish is:Connie Ragen Green:

I have experience now.

Connie Ragen Green:

I've been doing it every day, so it doesn't feel like much at all.

Melissa Brown:

It's amazing how the trends have changed in

Melissa Brown:

blog post or article writing.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Melissa Brown:

I don't wanna call it controversial, but another thing that

Melissa Brown:

you suggest is having an opinion, and don't be afraid to say what

Melissa Brown:

your opinion is in your writing.

Melissa Brown:

I see a lot of people create that vanilla- type content where there's no opinion.

Melissa Brown:

It's just the facts, ma'am, so to speak.

Melissa Brown:

And when you start putting the opinions, and stories, anecdotes, things like that.

Melissa Brown:

That's what gives it such life.

Melissa Brown:

That's what gives your writing so much flavor.

Melissa Brown:

Connie Ragen Green: Definitely, definitely.

Melissa Brown:

Because, I was the people pleaser person.

Melissa Brown:

I was someone that didn't wanna say anything to rock a boat or

Melissa Brown:

anything ,especially at work I was at, or schools I was teaching at.

Melissa Brown:

And when I did speak up and I spoke up for the kids, for my minority

Melissa Brown:

children that many of the other teachers didn't want to be teaching, then

Melissa Brown:

that was the first time I experienced that and it really was painful.

Melissa Brown:

It hurt.

Melissa Brown:

They were attacking me, not my idea.

Melissa Brown:

That's how I felt.

Melissa Brown:

And I thought, well, when I come online then that won't be a problem cause I'll

Melissa Brown:

just write what everybody wants to read.

Melissa Brown:

And very quickly I realized I couldn't do that.

Melissa Brown:

Once I had spoken up for those students, something inside me shifted.

Melissa Brown:

And now I have to speak my mind.

Melissa Brown:

So the first thing was about the huge profits with a tiny list.

Melissa Brown:

Somebody that was a big name who's still around, said, you're not a

Melissa Brown:

player in the online world until you have a list of 10,000 people.

Melissa Brown:

And very quickly and very vehemently, I guess is the right word, I said, well,

Melissa Brown:

good thing I didn't get that memo.

Melissa Brown:

Cause I hit six figures long before I had a thousand level and 10,000.

Melissa Brown:

So anybody can do well online.

Melissa Brown:

Your numbers don't make any difference.

Melissa Brown:

So that became a big issue online.

Melissa Brown:

And then I wrote that first book about it.

Melissa Brown:

I was blogging about it, and finally, now people don't even say that.

Melissa Brown:

It's good to have more people in your community.

Melissa Brown:

That's a good thing.

Melissa Brown:

But if they aren't responsive, they're just sitting like a bump on the log,

Melissa Brown:

taking up space and costing you money.

Melissa Brown:

We want people that are responsive and all that.

Melissa Brown:

But it was funny.

Melissa Brown:

I said, yeah, good thing I didn't get that memo.

Melissa Brown:

That was the phrase.

Melissa Brown:

That was the phrase, didn't get that memo.

Connie Ragen Green:

He didn't like that.

Connie Ragen Green:

He didn't like it one bit.

Connie Ragen Green:

And, that's okay.

Connie Ragen Green:

Now I'm okay with that.

Connie Ragen Green:

Cause I didn't attack him.

Connie Ragen Green:

I just felt what he was saying, he didn't fully know about.

Melissa Brown:

Speak your mind.

Melissa Brown:

Have an opinion, right?

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

We must.

Connie Ragen Green:

We must.

Melissa Brown:

Your number six in that article, and by the way, I'm

Melissa Brown:

gonna make sure that we get the link for this article cause I think it's

Melissa Brown:

just so cool for everybody -is about the having the right story structure.

Melissa Brown:

Tell us a little bit about that story structure.

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, story structure, I guess that's something that

Connie Ragen Green:

we can interpret cause it's something right now I'm really working with

Connie Ragen Green:

in the stories that I'm telling that will end up being television or film.

Connie Ragen Green:

I don't even know where to begin with that.

Connie Ragen Green:

You have to know what your message is.

Connie Ragen Green:

What's your message to the world with what you're trying to write.

Connie Ragen Green:

And even if it's a 750 word blog post, there's a message in there somewhere.

Connie Ragen Green:

And then how is the person you're serving cuz your a reader, you're serving them.

Connie Ragen Green:

You don't want 'em to read it and say, oh, that was nice.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's a kiss of death.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's the worst thing that could happen.

Connie Ragen Green:

So you wanna explain how this can affect them.

Connie Ragen Green:

What they could start doing differently.

Connie Ragen Green:

So, I don't know if I'm really answering your question because

Connie Ragen Green:

it's a complicated, sophisticated strategy, the story structure.

Connie Ragen Green:

How do you think of story structure?

Melissa Brown:

Like you, I think there is a lot that goes into

Melissa Brown:

this concept of story structure.

Melissa Brown:

In marketing, oftentimes segueing in from the story where you had an emotion or you

Melissa Brown:

experienced something, and that's the same thing that your audience is experiencing.

Melissa Brown:

You're telling a story and you're segueing into, well, now

Melissa Brown:

here's why I told you that story.

Melissa Brown:

And then you provide a solution or you show them how you

Melissa Brown:

have overcome this problem.

Melissa Brown:

When I hear story structure, that's kind of where I go.

Melissa Brown:

But I know you've got a lot more about that in that blog article, which is

Melissa Brown:

another reason I want the listeners to go back and read that and really digest it.

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah, because I think, at the end of the day,

Connie Ragen Green:

we want people to feel something.

Connie Ragen Green:

Whatever that emotion is.

Connie Ragen Green:

Whatever that ends up being for them because if you don't feel something

Connie Ragen Green:

from something we hear or see or read, it's just another thing that day

Connie Ragen Green:

that we heard or we saw or we read.

Connie Ragen Green:

But I think once people feel something, then anything is possible.

Connie Ragen Green:

So like today, it's giving Tuesday today as you and I are speaking.

Connie Ragen Green:

I give away 50% of what I gross each year, and that's become a big part of

Connie Ragen Green:

my life, a really huge part of my life.

Connie Ragen Green:

And today I was over on Kiva and I'm writing a story right now that's

Connie Ragen Green:

about someone that I grew up with.

Connie Ragen Green:

When my mom and I moved in next door to him and his family, it

Connie Ragen Green:

showed me that I could make money.

Connie Ragen Green:

I was 11 and then I was 12 and I was making money, and that meant

Connie Ragen Green:

we had food on the table and we'd always have money for rent.

Connie Ragen Green:

That was a big thing.

Connie Ragen Green:

He came from a very difficult situation, and the father was from Albania and

Connie Ragen Green:

had been very active with the Nazis.

Connie Ragen Green:

I learned this much later, so when I went to Kiva today, I just had Albania

Connie Ragen Green:

in my mind from the story I'm writing.

Connie Ragen Green:

So I lent $25 to a woman in Albania, who's growing crops so she can

Connie Ragen Green:

sell fruits and vegetables locally.

Connie Ragen Green:

That kind of thing.

Connie Ragen Green:

When I looked at her, I saw my friend who's since passed away.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I think that's what we want.

Connie Ragen Green:

We want things that are connected to each other.

Connie Ragen Green:

Things that are like a family of ideas, where one thing is

Connie Ragen Green:

connected to the next thing, to the next thing to the next thing.

Connie Ragen Green:

And if I could encourage one person to make a $25 loan.

Connie Ragen Green:

It's a loan.

Connie Ragen Green:

We're not even donating the money.

Connie Ragen Green:

And out of all the years I've done it, there's only one loan

Connie Ragen Green:

that defaulted in all these years.

Connie Ragen Green:

But if somebody could feel something from that, that's what makes a

Connie Ragen Green:

difference for the world, for all of us.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah.

Melissa Brown:

There are so many people I know that listen to this, that are out there

Melissa Brown:

to make a difference in the world.

Melissa Brown:

And giving back is, well, that's huge.

Melissa Brown:

That's huge.

Melissa Brown:

That Kiva program, I've, participated in that for many years.

Melissa Brown:

And you're right.

Melissa Brown:

Today is giving Tuesday, which, hopefully by the time people listen

Melissa Brown:

to this, it will be history and all of the non-profits have made

Melissa Brown:

all the money that they are seeking.

Melissa Brown:

Wouldn't that be a nice world?

Connie Ragen Green:

Yeah, because you know the story I told myself,

Connie Ragen Green:

Melissa, before I came online, I said, oh, someday, someday I'm gonna

Connie Ragen Green:

volunteer and I'm gonna donate money.

Connie Ragen Green:

I'm gonna do fundraising and all these things, but I don't

Connie Ragen Green:

have time or money right now.

Connie Ragen Green:

Well, it wasn't true.

Connie Ragen Green:

I had $50 a month.

Connie Ragen Green:

I really did, and I had probably two or three hours on a Saturday

Connie Ragen Green:

cuz I worked pretty much seven days, real estate and teaching.

Connie Ragen Green:

All those years.

Connie Ragen Green:

But I had two, three hours once a month on a Saturday and

Connie Ragen Green:

I had $50 I could have done.

Connie Ragen Green:

But I didn't.

Connie Ragen Green:

I didn't feel like it was enough to even do when that was so much.

Connie Ragen Green:

It was so much, there's so many things that we can do.

Melissa Brown:

We can all make a difference.

Melissa Brown:

Yes.

Connie Ragen Green:

We can all make a difference.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I'm in Rotary.

Connie Ragen Green:

That was the first service organization that I joined, and I've been

Connie Ragen Green:

all over the world with Rotary.

Connie Ragen Green:

That introduced me to traveling internationally to do work, to do good in

Connie Ragen Green:

the world because being poor in America or in Canada even, it's nothing compared

Connie Ragen Green:

to being poor in most of the world.

Melissa Brown:

Yeah.

. Connie Ragen Green:

Our description of poor, like I say, when my mother and

. Connie Ragen Green:

I, we were very poor growing up, that's nothing compared to what much of the

. Connie Ragen Green:

world is experiencing on a daily basis.

. Connie Ragen Green:

We have such impact with our platform being online.

. Connie Ragen Green:

We can plant a seed of something.

. Connie Ragen Green:

Somebody might say, Kiva, I don't even know what that means.

. Connie Ragen Green:

And if they just learn the meaning of it today, that's enough.

. Connie Ragen Green:

They've moved one step closer to doing something.

Melissa Brown:

Beautiful.

Melissa Brown:

Well, in the spirit of giving back, I know Connie, you've got something that

Melissa Brown:

you would like to offer to the listeners.

Melissa Brown:

Tell us about that.

Connie Ragen Green:

I do, I have a course, it's called Really Simple

Connie Ragen Green:

Authority Blogging, and I consider an authority blog one that will make a

Connie Ragen Green:

difference for you with your content, with credibility, with visibility,

Connie Ragen Green:

and that all leads to profitability.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I created this course about four years ago.

Connie Ragen Green:

I've taught it live, I believe, three times, and I probably

Connie Ragen Green:

will teach it live again, but I don't have dates set for that.

Connie Ragen Green:

So in the meantime, it's in home study.

Connie Ragen Green:

And I would love for people to be able to go there.

Connie Ragen Green:

You'll provide the link for them, you'll create a username and a password.

Connie Ragen Green:

You will be added to my list, but that could be a good thing.

Connie Ragen Green:

You never know.

Connie Ragen Green:

That way you can go through the course.

Connie Ragen Green:

You can email me anytime and ask me questions about it.

Connie Ragen Green:

You can get started and perhaps you're already creating content, you're already

Connie Ragen Green:

doing things, but having that blog, that's considered an authority blog.

Connie Ragen Green:

So when somebody googles your name, they'll find your blog right

Connie Ragen Green:

there near the top of page one.

Connie Ragen Green:

That's really what you want and you want to make an impact.

Connie Ragen Green:

You wanna change people's thinking so that they can have a better life.

Connie Ragen Green:

They can do something bigger than what they're doing now, that they

Connie Ragen Green:

might not even be desiring today.

Connie Ragen Green:

Cause we all have something bigger than what we're doing.

Melissa Brown:

That is so generous of you and I thank you for that, for the

Melissa Brown:

listeners here in the spirit of paying it forward, when you've got your authority

Melissa Brown:

blog, all set up, just pay it forward.

Melissa Brown:

Thank you, Connie, that is such a generous gift.

Connie Ragen Green:

Oh, you're welcome.

Connie Ragen Green:

You're welcome.

Melissa Brown:

I'll make sure that all of the links and information is in the show

Melissa Brown:

notes so people can find that easily.

Connie Ragen Green:

Excellent.

Connie Ragen Green:

Excellent.

Connie Ragen Green:

One way you can pay it forward with a blog is let somebody do a guest post for you.

Connie Ragen Green:

Give them an idea.

Connie Ragen Green:

Let them look at your blog.

Connie Ragen Green:

Read around a little bit, and perhaps you would do that, Melissa.

Connie Ragen Green:

She would write a guest post for my blog.

Melissa Brown:

Absolutely.

Connie Ragen Green:

Now I know you've been reading ConnieRagenGreen.

Melissa Brown:

Yes, absolutely.

Melissa Brown:

I would be honored.

Melissa Brown:

Okay.

Melissa Brown:

All right, well, Connie, this has been really great.

Melissa Brown:

We've gone all the way from you raising chimps to helping all of us

Melissa Brown:

with sharpening up our writing skills and such a generous gift that you've

Melissa Brown:

given to all the listeners here today.

Melissa Brown:

I thank you so much for being here and thank you for all you do in the world.

Melissa Brown:

And, yes, just thank you.

Connie Ragen Green:

You're welcome.

Connie Ragen Green:

And thank you so much for having me as your guest.

Melissa Brown:

And thank you to all the listeners here on

Melissa Brown:

the She's Got Content Podcast.

Melissa Brown:

And don't forget to go check out the show notes with all those links.

Melissa Brown:

And also don't forget to keep getting your content out there

Melissa Brown:

because somebody is looking for you.

Melissa Brown:

The more content you've got, the more likely they'll find you.

Melissa Brown:

So until next week, thanks a lot and have a great week.

Melissa Brown:

Thank you for tuning into this episode of the She's Got Content podcast.

Melissa Brown:

I hope you got at least one nugget to take action on this week.

Melissa Brown:

If you got value from today's episode, I would be so grateful

Melissa Brown:

when you leave a five star rating wherever you listen to podcasts.

Melissa Brown:

It only takes a second and it really helps me get my message out

Melissa Brown:

to impact even more people so they can in turn, keep the ripple going.

Melissa Brown:

If you're listening on Apple Podcast and leave a review of the show, it

Melissa Brown:

would really make my day, and you just might receive a shout out on

Melissa Brown:

the show as my Content Creator of the week when I read out your review.

Melissa Brown:

And last but never least, if you want an endless supply of just right ideas

Melissa Brown:

for content you can write about for your blog post, your emails, your videos,

Melissa Brown:

podcast episodes, all the content things, then you wanna head over to my

Melissa Brown:

website at shesgotcontent.com/content and pick up your free workbook,

Melissa Brown:

Never Run Out of Content Ideas.

Melissa Brown:

Look for that link in the show notes today along with the other

Melissa Brown:

links mentioned in today's episode.

Melissa Brown:

Until next time, Content Creators, you've got an audience waiting to hear from you

Melissa Brown:

and you've got content to share with them.

Melissa Brown:

Stop being the best kept secret and make a bigger impact when you've

This blog post may contain recommendations for products, services, and events. In some cases, the links provided are affiliate links. That means that if you click on the link and then buy a product at the site recommended, you won't pay a penny more and the author may earn compensation as a thank you. You can be assured that any of the promoted products have personally been used by or researched by the author for you and found to be high quality before being recommended. 

Melissa Brown, MD

About the author

Dr. Melissa Brown's career journey has always had an element of teaching. After retirement from clinical pediatric practice, Dr. Brown has taught and mentored as a healthy lifestyle coach, author, and speaker. She currently teaches solopreneurs and coaches how to stop being the world's best-kept secret. Her mission is to help you: Create great content. Impact people. Change the world.

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